Retirement Home

Power of Attorney (POA)

Anyone—at any age—should consider setting up an estate plan, including a Power of Attorney (POA). A POA is a legal document that grants someone you trust the legal authority to make critical health care and financial decisions for you when you’re not able to do so.

The person you name is called a POA agent. You can name more than one person as your POA agent. Typically, health care and financial POAs are separate documents—and there are different kinds of POAs (for example, “durable” versus “limited”).

An attorney can draft a POA specific to your needs. The laws governing POAs vary by state, so it’s a good idea to hire an attorney licensed in your state.

Download the Power of Attorney guide for important information and for a PG&E checklist of things your POA agent will need to know and do.

DON’T DELAY

It’s important to set up a POA while you’re able to do so. You can’t establish a POA after you become incapacitated—for example, if you’re unexpectedly hospitalized and unable to communicate.

Without a POA, your loved one doesn’t have the authority to make decisions for you. Instead, your loved one would need to ask the court to appoint a guardian or conservator—an expensive and time-consuming process.

MAKE SURE YOUR POA IS VALID

All POA documents must be signed and dated by you and notarized. You or your POA agent will need to provide the entire POA document to third parties (for example, to PG&E). In order to be valid, all pages must be intact and include the notarized signature page.

Some states also require signatures from witnesses and agents. An attorney can help you with the requirements.

ELECTING BENEFITS AND DESIGNATING BENEFICIARIES

If you want to allow your POA agent to elect benefits and designate beneficiaries—including naming themselves as a beneficiary—your POA document will need to clearly grant that authority to your agent.

California requires specific wording for retirement plan transactions, including making benefit elections and designating beneficiaries. Generic POA forms available online do not include this required wording—so be sure to hire an attorney that can draft a POA specific to your needs.

RESOURCES FOR YOUR POA AGENT

Your POA agent can download the Power of Attorney guide for a PG&E checklist of important information and deadlines.

I’M A POA AGENT AND I NEED TO:

Register my Power of Attorney (POA) with PG&E so I can act on behalf of my principal (the person I represent)

Change benefit coverage for my principal

Get a copy of my principal’s Personalized Enrollment Worksheet to see available plans and costs

PG&E Benefit Service Center
Representatives are available Monday–Friday, 7:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Pacific Time.
1-866-271-8144

POA agents will need to call to:

  • Register the POA
  • Request a Personalized Enrollment Worksheet
  • Find out how much is available in their principal’s PG&E-funded retirement account (RMSA, RMEC, RPOA) to help pay for retiree medical premiums
  • Make benefit elections for their principal
Get a copy of the Open Enrollment Guide and Medical Plan Comparison Charts
Go to Open Enrollment Guides
Update my principal’s address
Address updates for pension, retiree medical and postretirement life insurance PG&E Pension Service Center
Representatives are available Monday–Friday, 7:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Pacific Time.
1-800-700-0057
Address updates for PG&E 401(k) plan Fidelity
Representatives are available Monday–Friday except New York Stock Exchange holidays, 5:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Pacific Time.
1-877-743-4015